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MetalInjection reviews God Told Me To

So the album has been out for a couple of weeks now and the feedback has been pretty good. Fans have been reviewing the album – you can read them here – and we have had a number of professional reviews in.

Now read MetalInjection.net’s review of John 5′s God Told Me To.

Enjoy!

CD Review: JOHN 5 – God Told Me To by Sol

If you’re like me, you might forever associate John 5 with Marilyn Manson, and depending on who you are, that might be a bad or a good thing. (more…)


God Told Me To reviewed by Bare Bones Music

Following on from their interview with John 5, Bare Bones Music have also reviewed his new album God Told Me To giving it a four and a half skulls out of 5 rating.

Enjoy!

God Told Me To By: Johnny Price

JOHN 5 has just released his newest solo album and as always, he is keeping his fans on their toes. This is a musician who continues to peel away creative layer after creative layer, almost re-inventing himself each time. (more…)


sputnikmusic.com reviews God Told Me To

Yet another review in for John 5′s new album God Told Me To which was released today officially. This time from SputnickMusic.

Review by insomniac15.

Summary: John 5′s most accessible and interesting work.
God Told Me To is a departure from the usual John 5 albums, bringing a much needed change to his solo career. This time he traded all the bluegrass with lovely acoustic numbers, thus marking John’s not only one of his most interesting albums, but also one of his most accessible work, if not the most. (more…)


Metal Assault reviews God Told Me To

Read this brilliant 10 out of 10 review from Metal Assault

By Aniruddh “Andrew” Bansal

Despite the plethora of heavy music releases I’ve reviewed this year, it’s been a while since I came across an out-and-out rock guitar album, and finally, I got my hands on one. Rob Zombie and ex-Marilyn Manson guitarist John 5 is releasing his sixth solo album, “God Told Me To”, today on May 8th 2012. (more…)


Target Audience Magazine reviews God Told Me To

Read this fantastic review from TargetAudience Magazine for John 5′s new album ‘God Told Me To‘.

Review by Russell Eldridge

Half of God Told Me To will appease even the pickiest of shred fans and the other half will soothe the souls of those more into the wooden tones of delta acoustic, highland melodies, and acoustic shredders

John5′s new CD God Told Me To is an exciting, scary, sexy, and twisted shred masterpiece. (more…)


Spanish webzine La Estadea reviews God Told Me To

God Told Me To cover - album by John 5 - cover art by Rob ZombieRead this stunning 9 out of 10 review of John 5′s forthcoming ‘God Told Me To’ from Spanish webzine La Estadea. Thank you to Mike from the site for providing the translation. You can read the original Spanish review by clicking HERE

‘God told me to‘ is the sixth solitary studio album from the Rob Zombie and ex-Marilyn Manson guitar player, John William Lowery, AKA John 5. The first and remarkable impression, is the aggressive cover artwork (painted by Rob Zombie itself) (more…)


CirclePit reviews God Told Me To

‘The Don’ at CirclePit has reviewed ‘God Told Me To

Read it here: http://www.circlepit.tv/album-reviews/john5-god-told-me-to


Gigseen reviews God Told Me To

Read this fantatsic review from Gigseen for the new album ‘God Told Me To’

Album Review: John 5 ‘God Told Me To’ Review by Kate Fletcher

Ex-Marilyn Manson guitarist and member in Rob Zombie, John 5′s God Told Me To is his sixth solo album. Taking elements from his past material as well as moving in new directions, this record really defies any genre, and showcases one of the most talented and underrated modern guitarists.

The follow-on from 2010′s The Art Of Malice, this ten track, instrumental album shifts between John 5′s well-known and loved blend of electric guitar, speed metal style, and his newly found acoustic guitar sensibility. (more…)


Hardrockhaven reviews God Told Me To

John 5′s eagerly awaited studio album God Told Me To will hit shelves on May 8 2012. But if you are looking for a review on what to expect, then here is the first review from HardrockHaven.net.

We’ll post more as we get them.

John 5 | God Told Me To

March 5, 2012 by Alissa Ordabai Staff Writer: Read the full review here: hardrockhaven.net/john-5-god-told-me-to/

Torn in two – between the past and the future, between the old formulas and an emerging new perception – is how John 5 sounds on his new album. To highlight the clash between his familiar tried-and-tested electric guitar methods and the newly found acoustic guitar sensibility, the track list intentionally alternates acoustic and electric cuts, contrasting tenderness against violence, contemplation against recklessness, elegance against brutality. (more…)


Life Music Media reviews The Art of Malice

John 5 “The Art of Malice” CD Review: Ben Hosking: http://lifemusicmedia.com/?p=10104

While ‘The Art of Malice’ is an instrumental album; you probably don’t need to be a guitarist to know who John 5 is. John 5 has played guitar for Marilyn Manson and is the current axeman in Rob Zombie’sband. Rubbing shoulders with two of the freakiest dudes in modern rock/metal surely goes some way to explaining John 5’s compulsion to shave his eyebrows and apply the face paint.

The Art of Malice is John 5’s third solo effort and shows the country-infused chicken-pickin’ shredder continuing to expand his chops and grow as a songwriter. Where ‘Requiem’ and Songs for Sanity affirmed his place in the pantheon of interesting and intense guitar instrumentalists, ‘The Art…” will go a long way to securing his position as an equally interesting songwriter as well.

For newcomers to the crazy world of John 5, it’d be all too easy to pass him off on the strength of his visual appearance. Don’t judge a book by its cover. John 5 is well known within guitar circles for his different take on what shred is meant to be with skills like string bending behind the nut and his choice of the Fender Telecaster isn’t exactly the norm’ for creating killer licks.

No, John 5 is not all about metal. He’s not all about rock, shock or anything else. The Art of Malicecontains moments of countrified quirkiness like the hybrid-picked mayhem of ‘JW’ and the steel guitar meanderings of, well… ‘Steel Guitar Rag’. Country even finds its way into more conventional-sounding rock tunes like ‘The Nightmare Unravels’ through his use of hybrid picking – a style that when used correctly can greatly increase the number of notes you can play per minute.

The Art of Malice is a dynamic record that peaks and troughs well throughout its 12 tracks. Just as you get comfy immersing yourself within the drama of slower tracks like ‘Can I live Again’ and the tension of ‘Fractured Mirror’, you’re beaten over the head by thrashy outbursts and millions of notes in tracks like ‘Portrayed as Unremorseful’.

John 5’s new disc even offers some cool guest spots, like Billy Sheehan (Mr. Big, Steve Vai, David Lee Roth, et al) playing bass on ‘Ya Dig?’ and Tommy Clufetos (Ozzy Osbourne, Rob Zombie, Ted Nugent and Alice Cooper) playing drums throughout.

Whether you’re new to John 5’s idiosyncratic style or an existing fan, The Art of Malice is one you’re going to want in your collection or on your playlist. In a world of ‘same same’ solo guitarists,John 5 stands out as an unrepentant individualist. He has more talent in his one eyebrow than most players have in their whole bodies. Try him out.


Number of the Blog reviews The Art of Malice

Fucking Metal Album Reviews: John 5 – The Art Of Malice: fucking-metal-album-reviews-john-5-the-art-of-malice/

June 4th, 2010. By groverXIII

John 5 is, for the uninitiated, best known for his guitarwork with Marilyn Manson and, more recently, Rob Zombie. Those two names might be enough to make you skeptical when I tell you that the man is an absurdly talented guitarist with a number of impressive solo albums under his belt. However, I assure you that this is indeed the case. The Art Of Malice brings this total to five, not counting an additional remix album; like his previous solo albums, The Art Of Malice features instrumental, guitar-driven tracks mixing metal and bluegrass in varying measures.

The album art may be enough to turn your stomach; between the loud colors, odd makeup, and questionable clothing choice, it’s fair to say that this is a pretty unappealing introduction to Senor Cinco’s music. However, I urge you to resist the temptation to judge this particular book by its cover. Once you dive in, you may be surprised at what you find.

The album starts off with a blast with ‘The Nightmare Unravels’, as atmospheric guitar sounds give way to an explosive riff and lightning-fast soloing. This track truly exhibits what John 5 does best, pairing lead pyrotechnics with catchy melodies. ‘The Art Of Malice’ is a shorter track of bluegrass picking, another of John 5′s calling cards, and features no additional instruments beyond the guitar. As the album continues on, the tracks almost seem to be divided between heavy and mellow, occasionally crossing paths as some bluegrass picking finds its way into the heavier tracks, but the album almost seems to alternate between the two styles.

There are some curveballs in here, though; ‘Ya Dig’ features a fast, heavy vibe and a guest bass performance from Billy Sheehan. ‘Can I Live Again’ is a slow, mournful tune, full of sadness and emotion. And ‘Fractured Mirror’ is a version of the Ace Frehley song, which would explain why it feels out of place. Still, all of these tracks are oozing with 5′s style; most of these cuts wouldn’t be out of place on his earlier stuff.

And in the end, that’s the part that trips me up somewhat. Perhaps it’s because of my level of familiarity with his older albums, but there something about The Art Of Malice that feels a bit stale. The heavier songs don’t seem to grab me quite the way that his previous work has, and it seems as though there are less heavy songs on this album than usual. I’ve always felt that the heavy stuff was his bread and butter, with occasional bluegrass interludes, and it feels as though the slower moments here start to disrupt the flow of the album a bit.

Still, The Art Of Malice is a really good album, packed to the gills with flashy guitar playing and catchy melodies. The slower moments are more than made up for by the stronger parts of the album, and as a whole the album is a worthy entry into John 5′s solo catalog. It’s certainly better than the last couple of Rob Zombie albums.

My score: 4.5 out of 6


Mind Over Metal reviews The Art of Malice

John 5 – The Art of Malice released May 11, 2010 on 60 Cycle Hum Records/Rocket Science Ventures: mindovermetal.org/review-john-5-the-art-of-malice/

Rating : 3.5/5

John 5 is a jack-of-many-trades when it comes to guitar. We just heard some of his work on Rob Zombie‘s Hellbilly Deluxe 2 earlier this year, although that album wrapped up recording in 2008 (the year his fourth solo effort, Requiem, was released). I was apprehensive approaching The Art of Malice because I have not seen a color scheme like this since Jack Johnson‘s Curious George soundtrack. Thankfully, it is virtuosic yet listenable, humorous and heavy, with a unique stamp that is nearly complete.

Opener and lead single “The Nightmare Unravels” is the best, biggest, and flashiest original number here, where he pulls out all the stops to better slacken your jaw. The closest competitor is “Ya Dig?” (in sly salute to“Diamond” Dave), which features none other than Billy Sheehan (they both played with DLR, albeit a decade apart). But the obvious tribute is found in “Fractured Mirror” from Ace Frehley‘s eponymous solo album, which receives loving treatment on The Art of Malice. I never noticed how much that song reminds me of Ozzy‘s “You Can’t Kill Rock and Roll” before now.

John 5 will surprise you, too. He reminds us that one of his toes always dips into country, as he demonstrates in “J.W.” (his first two initials, John William). And the slide guitar twang of “Can I Live Again” can wrench a tear from the driest eye. But my favorite smash into left field was certainly “Steel Guitar Rag”, which effectively transports the listener a century back.

“Portrayed as Unremorseful” gives more than one nod to Mr. Joe Satriani for the duration, and sidesteps intoLed Zeppelin‘s “Heartbreaker” for half a minute in the middle. I also like the feral cat yowls he elicits from his instrument throughout “Wayne County Killer” (named after murderer Chad Campbell). After revving up one last time in “The S-Lot”, “The Last Page Turned” lets you down easy with beautifully intricate acoustic work.

John 5 is an artist determined to flourish in the music world. By continuously challenging himself, he has shared the stage with musicians as disparate as Marilyn Manson and k.d. lang. On The Art of Malice, his signature sound (by way of Fender Telecaster) becomes all the more recognizable.

FCC OK
Try 1, 5, 7, 9


Hall of the Mountain King Reviews The Art of Malice

Review: John 5, “The Art of Malice”: http://www.mountainkingmusic.com/2010/05/review-john-5-art-of-malice.html

To be honest, I’ve been over the guitar god shred instrumental album for a long time now, but in recent years, I’ve become more and more impressed with the work of John 5 every time he pops up somewhere. That interest was enough to get me to give his new record “The Art of Malice” a shot.

Granted, there’s a lot of showy shredding here, as on any instrumental guitar record, but by and large the songs here are actual songs, not just a conveyance for John 5 to pack as many notes as possible into. Like any good tune, the songs here follow progressions and have solid hooks, albeit musical ones rather than vocal ones. 

Another thing that strikes me about this record is the great variety of moods and styles that clash here. There are rhythms and grooves on the record that just put a smile on your face, and there are reflective, melancholy moments. The genres represented pretty much run the gamut from old-fashioned down-home country to charging, bashing metal. Of course, what else would you expect from a guy that’s played for both Marilyn Manson and K.D. Lang?

“The Art of Malice” rocks straight out of the box with the catchy “The Nightmare Unravels,” which features the expected fast sweeping lead work. Then, the title track pulls in a little Spanish influence and the country twang from his Telecaster. It sounds a little like Roy Clark dabbling in Latin sounds. There’s definitely influence of guitar virtuosos who came before, particularly Joe Satriani on the high energy “Ill Will or Spite” and the crazy groove of “Ya Dig,” which blends elements of blues rock and country in a driving, high-octane shuffle.

There are plenty of those heavy rocking numbers here, including the big traditional metal riffing of “Wayne County Killer,” a personal favorite of mine. But, despite the cliché of the phrase, there really is something here for everyone. “J.W.” delivers a rockabilly boogie. “Can I Live Again” begins with a dark southern rock feel, reminiscent of “Floyd,” which he wrote with Lynyrd Skynyrd, and then moves into some soaring movie soundtrack-ish leads. “Steel Guitar Rag” is pretty much what the title says, with some wild old school country picking at the end. “Portrayed as Unremorseful” brings funk rock into the picture. “Fractured Mirror” is a trippy progressive number.

Album closer “The Last Page Turned” wows with an acoustic. It’s particularly striking coming at the end of a record that’s been all about shred, but John 5 proves with it that he’s just as good without electricity.

It’s almost insane how quickly this record goes from crushingly heavy to groove to twang, yet somehow it all flows. “The Art of Malice” proves John 5 to be as much a shredder as any of the guys that came out of the style’s 1980s heyday, but also a bit of a mad scientist, stitching together seemingly incongruous elements into an imposing Frankenstein monster.

Get “The Art of Malice.”


Theywillrockyou reviews The Art of Malice

Check out this great interview for John 5′s new album The Art of Malice:

http://theywillrockyou.com/2010/04/cd-review-john-5-art-malice/

John 5
The Art of Malice

Rating: star CD Review:  John 5 / The Art Of Malicestar CD Review:  John 5 / The Art Of Malicestar CD Review:  John 5 / The Art Of Malicestar CD Review:  John 5 / The Art Of Malicestar CD Review:  John 5 / The Art Of Malice

Reviewed by:  Antonio Marino Jr.

It’s been 20 years since John Lowery, a wirey metal-head from the well-to-do community of Grosse Point, MI, packed his guitar and headed to Hollywood. He shared the dream of countless other guitar players growing up in the late 80’s -   move to Hollywood and “make it big”.  Unlike the countless others, he’s still standing.  Along the way John Lowery became John 5 and that outcast kid from Michigan has flourished as a musical chameleon.  As the guitar player in Rob Zombie’s band he’s afforded the platform to shred; to be the guitar player kids in basements around the world aspire to be. However, it’s on John 5’s solo releases that we get to see a different side of him. There are always ample doses of shred for all of the guitar-heads and he sprinkles in a healthy dose of non-shred that usually includes county-style guitar licks that remind us that the time he spent in K.D Lang’s band was time well spent. (more…)


BackstageAxxess reviews The Art of Malice

John 5 – The Art of Malice: Review by Dee Haley: http://www.backstageaxxess.com/index.php/cdreviews/244-fozzy-and-john-5-cd-reviews

John 5 of Marilyn Manson, David Lee Roth, Rob Halford and currently Rob Zombie fame, is about to release a new solo CD.  THE ART OF MALICE is John 5’s 5th album to date and it’s scheduled to be available on May 11th on 60 Cycle Hum/Rocket Science Ventures.

This CD is a showcase for John 5’s diverse guitar techniques.  The CD begins with hard-driving rhythms as the “Nightmare Unravels.”  Those rhythms continue from beginning to end. This album is an instrumental slice of guitar virtuosity.  It has everything from chicken pickin’ to shredding with some flamenco splashed in for good measure. The title track “The Art of Malice,” moves with the fluidity of a traditional Spanish dancer leading up to some serious shredding in “Ill Will or Spite.”

The next track, “J.W.” has a Junior Brown-esque rockabilly feel to it.  That rockabilly flavor comes back later on “Steel Guitar Rag” with hints of Stephen Foster’s bluegrass classic ‘Oh! Suzanna’ at the beginning of the track.  “Wayne County Killer” brings back the hard rockin’ riffs and is followed up with an impressive and true to form rendition of Ace Frehley’s “Fractured Mirror.”  As a huge Frehley fan, I can say with certainty that Ace Frehley worshipers will dig this one.

This guitar oriented CD wraps up with an amazing acoustic track called “The Last Page” and this album, in its entirety, portrays a phenomenal glimpse into John 5′s influences.  It’s all instrumental and with John 5, that’s all you need!!!
THE ART OF MALICE  is a must have for guitar aficionados.